Upgrading to EndNote 20 – Important Information

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The latest version of the EndNote citation management software, EndNote 20, will become available to the MSK community on Wednesday, July 7th, 2021.

Established EndNote users should be aware that significant changes have been made to this latest release of EndNote.

Please review the information below to avoid any unexpected/unwelcome surprises and/or work disruptions on time-sensitive/critical projects.

  1. How does EndNote 20 differ from previous versions?
  2. How do I get EndNote 20?
  3. Can I upgrade to EndNote20 and keep the previous version on my machine too?
  4. What are EndNote 20’s compatibility and system requirements?
  5. Do I need to worry about my existing EndNote library files not working in EndNote 20?
  6. What should I do to avoid potential compatibility problems?
  7. If I create EndNote 20 libraries that my colleagues (who have not upgraded to EndNote 20) cannot open, what should I do?
  8. How do I get training on EndNote 20?
  9. Who should I contact if I run into any issues when upgrading to or using EndNote 20?
  10. Are there other citation management options available via MSK that I can use instead of EndNote 20?

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1. How does EndNote 20 differ from previous versions?

EndNote users familiar with a previous version can compare features and review the differences on the EndNote website (for comparisons going back to X4, see here) or read about them on the MSK Library blog post where they can also view the 2:01 min video entitled: “What’s new in EndNote 20”.

2. How do I get EndNote 20?

a) PC/Windows Desktops connected to the MSK Network (onsite workstations and VCD):

If you currently use EndNote by accessing it in the MSK User Applications folder via the Windows start menu, then EndNote 20 will simply appear there once the new version is released to all users on the MSK network. If you are a new EndNote user, you will still need to contact the Help Desk at 123-3337 or 646-227-3337 to first have EndNote added to your MSK account.

b) MSK-issued PC/Windows laptops:

If you have an earlier version of EndNote installed locally on a Windows laptop, then you can go to the MSK Self-Service Portal, listed as Company Portal in the Windows Start menu to download the app. If you do not see it listed as an app option, contact the Help Desk at 123-3337 or 646-227-3337 to have EndNote 20 added for you.

 

 

 


c) Macintosh Desktops and Laptops:

Macintosh users can use the MSK Self-Service Portal to install the upgraded EndNote 20 software. Please review the macOS and system requirements and call the Help Desk if you do not see the EndNote 20 app available to you for download.

d) Non-MSK Machines:

Current Endnote 20 policy is that the software will not be provided for use on personal computers.  Remote users can use Endnote 20 via Virtual machines.

3. Can I upgrade to EndNote 20 and keep the previous version on my machine too?

No. When you install EndNote 20 on a machine locally, this action will cause previous EndNote versions to first be uninstalled. EndNote 20 will replace previous EndNote versions on all networked PC workstations. Also, an EndNote 20 tab will appear in MS Word and this toolbar will only link with an X9.3 and later EndNote library.

4. What are EndNote 20’s compatibility and system requirements?

EndNote 20 Compatibility and System Requirements 

a) PC: Windows 10

b) Macintosh: macOS 10.14, 10.15, 11.

See full specifications at https://endnote.com/product-details/compatibility.

5. Do I need to worry about my existing EndNote library files not working in EndNote 20?

If you are using an existing EndNote library that was created in EndNote X9.2 or earlier, then you will be prompted to convert this library when you try to open it in EndNote 20 (or EndNote X9.3). 

Once you create an EndNote library in EndNote 20 (or are prompted by EndNote to convert an older library for use in EndNote version X9.3 or later) the library will NOT be compatible with earlier versions of the application (version X9.2 or earlier).

For this reason, it is strongly recommended that you upgrade to EndNote 20 on all computers that you will be using to access the EndNote desktop software.

6. What should I do to avoid potential compatibility problems?

Before converting an existing EndNote library to the new format, you may wish to create back-ups of any EndNote library files that are important to you. You may choose to back-up your libraries by using one or both of these options:

a) Sign up for an EndNote Online account and sync your important existing desktop EndNote libraries to your cloud-based EndNote Online account.

b) Save your important existing desktop EndNote libraries as “compressed” libraries (while in your current version of EndNote) by going to File > Compressed Library…

7. If I create EndNote 20 libraries that my colleagues (who have not upgraded to EndNote 20) cannot open, what should I do?

The best way to handle this situation is to share the citation records with your colleague(s) by using your EndNote Online account as an intermediary. You can sync your desktop EndNote library to your EndNote Online account and then share it with your colleague(s) just by going to File > Share… and inputting your colleague’s email (the same email that they will have used to create an EndNote Online account of their own).  They will then be able to sync these citations to their own EndNote desktop library (of an earlier version). See (1.02 min) video – In action: EndNote 20 (Windows) library sharing – Web of Science (webofsciencegroup.com)

8. How do I get training on EndNote 20?

a) MSK Library classes:

You may register for an upcoming EndNote 20 workshop offered by the MSK Library or submit a request for an individual training consultation.

b) EndNote (Clarivate Analytics) training options:

You may also wish to view short video tutorials on specific EndNote features. By going to EndNote’s YouTube training channel and selecting the EndNote 20 (Windows) essential features that includes 19 videos (all less than 2 mins in length).

Clarivate Analytics also has free live training options that you may register for and attend online or view as a recording (EndNote 20 essentials (Windows): a class recording). Also, a variety of Quick Reference Guides can be downloaded and consulted.

9. Who should I contact if I run into any issues when upgrading to or using EndNote 20?

a) MSK Library:

Research Informationists at the MSK Library are available to help you troubleshoot any EndNote issues. Feel free to contact them via the Ask-A-Librarian online form, via telephone, or Chat.

b) EndNote (Clarivate Analytics) product and technical support:

You can explore the EndNote knowledge base for answers to popular questions or contact an expert:

United States / Canada: +1 800-336-4474
EndNote.support@clarivate.com

10. Are there other citation management options available via MSK that I can use instead of EndNote 20?

For additional citation management software options, please review the MSK Library’s Citation Management LibGuide. Be sure to consult the citation manager comparison table to help you choose the citation management software tool that best fits your needs.

 Questions?  Ask Us at the MSK Library!

 

Sub-grouping PubMed Records by Their Linkages to Other NIH Resources

The National Library of Medicine (NLM), which is part of the NIH, is responsible for a wide array of information/data resources. In addition to biomedical literature databases like PubMed, PubMed Central, and the clinical trial registry, ClinicalTrials.gov, NLM also includes computational molecular biology resources and human genome resources among its database offerings, all of which are freely-available to everyone.

One of the great strengths of NLM’s resources is that they have been designed with maximum accessibility/linkages in mind. If you are searching in one database and there is information in another NLM resource that might also be relevant, chances are pretty good that the database record you are consulting will include meaningful embedded links-out to the other tools.

These connections between resources are particularly valuable for conducting specialized searches of the biomedical literature. The ability to sub-group PubMed records according to their inclusion in a “secondary source” means that you can limit a search within PubMed to a more relevant portion of PubMed, which is a powerful way to increase the precision of your search results.

Following are two different use cases where this sub-grouping functionality can be super-useful if you are carrying out targeted information retrieval projects.

Case 1: ClinicalTrials.gov

In ClinicalTrials.gov, each registered clinical trial record includes a “Study Results” tab where searchers can find publication lists (when available). These lists of article citations link back to PubMed records, which in turn are indexed with ClinicalTrials.gov identifiers. As a result of this set-up, if a searcher wishes to start in PubMed and search on their favorite topic across the published clinical trial study results identified in ClinicalTrials.gov, they can do so by adding the following to their PubMed search strategy:

Clinicaltrials.gov[si]  

For example: clinicaltrials.gov[si] AND sarcoma – Search Results – PubMed (nih.gov)

(Note: The ClinicalTrial.gov linkage will appear in the PubMed Abstract record in the “Associated data” section.)

Case 2: GeneRIF (Gene Reference into Function)

Another specialized literature search that is often tricky to carry out is one that limits the search results to those publications that describe a gene’s function. Luckily, NLM already has a program called GeneRIF (Gene Reference into Function) that “provides a simple mechanism to allow scientists to add to the functional annotation of genes described in Gene.” By leveraging these gene-PMID connections developed for the Gene database, PubMed searchers can limit their search results to only those PubMed records that have been tagged with a GeneRIF identifier. They can do this by adding the following to their PubMed search strategy:

“pubmed gene rif” [Filter]

For example: “pubmed gene rif” [Filter] AND sarcoma – Search Results – PubMed (nih.gov)

(Note: The GeneRIF linkage will appear in the PubMed Abstract record in the “Related information” section.) 

If you have any questions or would like some additional guidance on designing specialized literature searches, feel free to Ask Us at the MSK Library.

 

PRISMA 2020 Replaces PRISMA 2009

At the end of March 2021, the PRISMA 2020 guideline update was simultaneously published in five journals, officially marking the replacement of the PRISMA 2009 with the updated PRISMA 2020 guideline:

Page MJ, McKenzie JE, Bossuyt PM, Boutron I, Hoffmann TC, Mulrow CD, Shamseer L, Tetzlaff JM, Akl EA, Brennan SE, Chou R, Glanville J, Grimshaw JM, Hróbjartsson A, Lalu MM, Li T, Loder EW, Mayo-Wilson E, McDonald S, McGuinness LA, Stewart LA, Thomas J, Tricco AC, Welch VA, Whiting P, Moher D. The PRISMA 2020 statement: an updated guideline for reporting systematic reviews.

  • BMJ 2021 Mar 29;372:n71. doi: 10.1136/bmj.n71. PMID: 33782057; PMCID: PMC8005924.
  • Syst Rev. 2021 Mar 29;10(1):89. doi: 10.1186/s13643-021-01626-4. PMID: 33781348.
  • J Clin Epidemiol. 2021 Mar 17:S0895-4356(21)00073-1. doi: 10.1016/j.jclinepi.2021.03.001. PMID: 33789819.
  • Int J Surg. 2021 Apr;88:105906. doi: 10.1016/j.ijsu.2021.105906. Epub 2021 Mar 29.PMID: 33789826.
  • PLoS Med. 2021 Mar 29;18(3):e1003583. doi: 10.1371/journal.pmed.1003583. eCollection 2021 Mar. PMID: 33780438.

Published translations of this guideline into other languages are forthcoming.

For the most detailed description of the new PRISMA 2020 guideline, this accompanying “explanation and elaboration” article was also published:

  • Page MJ, Moher D, Bossuyt PM, Boutron I, Hoffmann TC, Mulrow CD, Shamseer L, Tetzlaff JM, Akl EA, Brennan SE, Chou R, Glanville J, Grimshaw JM, Hróbjartsson A, Lalu MM, Li T, Loder EW, Mayo-Wilson E, McDonald S, McGuinness LA, Stewart LA, Thomas J, Tricco AC, Welch VA, Whiting P, McKenzie JE. PRISMA 2020 explanation and elaboration: updated guidance and exemplars for reporting systematic reviews. BMJ. 2021 Mar 29;372:n160. doi: 10.1136/bmj.n160. PMID: 33781993; PMCID: PMC8005925.

  • For details about the process that was used to develop the PRISMA 2020 update:

    Page MJ, McKenzie JE, Bossuyt PM, Boutron I, Hoffmann TC, Mulrow CD, Shamseer L, Tetzlaff JM, Moher D. Updating guidance for reporting systematic reviews: development of the PRISMA 2020 statement. J Clin Epidemiol. 2021 Feb 9;134:103-112. doi: 10.1016/j.jclinepi.2021.02.003. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 33577987.

Noteworthy Changes in the PRISMA 2020 Update

Among the key PRISMA 2020 guideline changes are: more inclusive wording so that it’s more accommodating to other methods from different fields (ex., methods beyond randomized trials of health interventions); some of the categories have been broken down into more granular sub-items that are more explicit and provide more clarity about what exactly should be reported, some new items and sub-items have been introduced or expanded upon; and some of the items have been slightly re-ordered in the checklist.

The new PRISMA 2020 guideline is meant to reflect the changing reality of the current research climate. For example, now that more people are registering their protocols as is recommended by PRISMA, there is a sub-item added to address the clear reporting of potential protocol amendments. Also – in line with the open science movement, there are sub-items related to reporting about the availability of data and statistical code, etc. Furthermore, with automation tools starting to be considered for use in SRs, more explicit reporting in this area is also recommended, as well as the reporting of conflicts of interest of review authors, something which is becoming a more common requirement in all areas of scholarly publishing.

There also has been an obvious push towards greater transparency in the methods, with recommendations to include the full search strategies and number of results for all information resources searched (which is in accordance with the PRISMA-S extension also published this year), as well as to provide the full citations for all of the included studies and citations for the studies that were excluded at the full-text stage, with reasons.

This latest version of PRISMA also appears to recognize that often in SRs, the synthesis of the results includes the grouping or sub-grouping of studies for the analysis, which the guideline suggests should be better reported upon. PRISMA 2020 makes a more explicit request for the reporting of criteria and processes used to group studies. Related to this, PRISMA 2020 also encourages that the reporting of characteristics and risk of bias be handled not for all included studies as a whole but rather to be considered among sub-grouped studies contributing to each synthesis.


New Tools and Templates for PRISMA 2020

It should be noted that the PRISMA guidelines are recommendations and not every item in the checklist applies to every situation. (In fact, it is for that very reason that PRISMA extensions exist and should still be used in conjunction with PRISMA 2020 as not all of these have been perfectly harmonized as of yet.) As such – this guidance should be viewed as useful suggestions for improving the quality of reporting of a systematic review – keeping in mind, however, that not every item is always applicable and mandatory.

This spirit of flexibility is reflected in the increased template options made available on the PRISMA Statement website to accommodate different scenarios. Both the PRISMA 2020 Checklist and Flow Diagram template options are now available for viewing and downloading. In addition to the PDF and Word templates, Shiny App computer applications have also been created that can be used to more easily generate the completed checklist and flow diagram by inputting data.

To learn more, please view a recent presentation on PRISMA 2020 by the first author (Dr. Matthew Page, Monash University) responsible for the update and feel free to send us your questions at Ask Us at the MSK Library or to explore the Systematic Review Service LibGuide.